Monthly Archives: March 2016

Homemade Carrot Cake

After my visit to Brown’s Tea Bar in Munich, I was longing for a homemade piece of carrot cake like I had so often in Leeds. Because I knew I would miss the British cakes, I bought this wonderful book with most of the classic baking recipes. One of which is a recipe for a carrot cake I tried last weekend. I was sceptical if I would be able to hit the flavour I was used to but in the end it tasted just like I remembered.

For the carrot cake you need:

ingredients carrot cake
225g self-reaising flour

or if you can’t get self-raising flour, you can easily mix it by yourself. In that case, you need:

ca. 200-205g flour
adding baking powder up to 225g

1 tsp baking powder
1,5 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp mixed spices
225g brown sugar
zest of an 1/2 unwaxed orange
50g walnut pieces
50g raisins
3 eggs
150ml sunflower oil
250g grated carrots

Begin by peeling and grating the carrots since this takes away most of your preparation time.

peeling a carrot
After this, mix the flour, baking powder and the spices in a big bowl. Add the walnuts, the carrots, orange zest and raisins. Afterwards beat the eggs and mix it with the dry ingredients.

creating the dough

Finally add the oil and mix all well together before pouring it into a baking tray. Bake the cake for 25 minutes (180°C/350°F/gas 4) until it is nicely coloured. Let it cool down before topping it with the icing.

For the icing you need:

200g full fat cheese
50g unsalted butter
150g icing sugar
zest of 1/2 unwaxed orange
2 tsp orange juice

icing
Beat all the ingredients together and cover the cake with the icing. If it is warm you might have to cool the icing before putting it on top of the cake.
homemade carrot cake
It truly tasted like the several carrot cakes I had in England and just made the weekend a bit sweeter. It definitely made the grey weather less dreadful ;).

Do you also have longings for special food? Does specific food remind you of special events or trips?

Brown’s Tea Bar – British Experience in the middle of Munich

english breakfast teaSince I have been back from England I am looking out for cafés which might be serving some good old English Breakfast Tea along with great cake. One week ago on my trip to munich I finally found  what I was looking for.

Brown’s Tea Bar belongs to the café chain “The Victorian House” which runs five cafés in Munich. All of them offering a vast selection of different teas and homemade cakes. They even offer scones with original Cornish clotted cream.

I literally entered the café and felt like being back in Britain. The cakes looked amazing and tasted like heaven. I tried the banofee pie and my friend settled on a coffee-chocolate-nut cake. Both were equally great.

Banofee PieIn addition to the great food the interior was very victorian. The room wasn’t very spacious and together with the thoughtful decoration, it felt very comfy. However, you need to be lucky or patient to find a spot for your visit.

interior Brown's Tea BarThe Victorian House also runs an online shop were you can buy all sorts of English biscuits and sweets and of course tea.

tea selection The café is located within walking distance to the Brandhorst Museum in the middly of the student quarter. We stayed there for quite some time and people just never stopped coming in ordering some cake or tea.

If you are in Munich you should definitely pop in and have a scone or two together with a warming cup of tea.

 

Painting 2.0 – interpretations of our modern world

While I was staying in Munich for a longer business trip I was able to squeeze in a visit of  the Brandhorst Museum. Until the end of april they are hosting an exhibition called “Painting 2.0 – Expression in the information age” focusing on modern and contemporary art.

Brandhorst Museum Munich

The museum is located near the university and can be reached easily by taking a bus from the central station. The exhibition features over 230 paintings by 107 different artists. With this, it is one of the biggest exhibitions of contemporary art. Since the 1960s, artists have been discussing societal changes and the meaning of art within their work.

“Painting 2.0” shows in three inter-related sections how artists handled questions like the meaning of corporality or the development of social networks.The first thing you see entering the gallery is a container filled with destroyed pictures. Martin Kippenberger addresses with this work the relationship of art and spectacle. This relationship is the focus of the first section. It concentrates on the question of how art is able to create spectacles itself but also how it can reflect a culture of spectacle.

Exhibition Painting 2.0

On the top floor, the museum shows works focusing on the question of corporality. Artists critically explore how technologies transform our image of us and others.

In the basement the exhibition is completed by paintings centred around social networks. So for example there you can find computer generated pictures or a painting of a huge socket symbolising our dependency on electricity.

For a good overview of the exhibition I found this video from the Bayerische Rundfunk.  Unfortunately it is only available in German but even without the text you get a good impression about the works shown in the exhibition.

Overall “Painting 2.0” looks at some of the pressing issues of our society. It explains and shows how art  paralleled societal changes since the 1960s and how it struggled around the question of its own meaning. The pictures might not have the beauty of a painting by Monet or Da Vinci but they challenge your perception and leave you with some deep thoughts about how technology changes our world.

For that reason and the great line-up of popular artists like Andy Warhol, Georg Baselitz or Martin Kippenberger the exhibition is worth every visit. It is running until the 30th April, so there is some time left for you to go.

Have you been to a great museum or exhibition lately?