Painting 2.0 – interpretations of our modern world

While I was staying in Munich for a longer business trip I was able to squeeze in a visit of  the Brandhorst Museum. Until the end of april they are hosting an exhibition called “Painting 2.0 – Expression in the information age” focusing on modern and contemporary art.

Brandhorst Museum Munich

The museum is located near the university and can be reached easily by taking a bus from the central station. The exhibition features over 230 paintings by 107 different artists. With this, it is one of the biggest exhibitions of contemporary art. Since the 1960s, artists have been discussing societal changes and the meaning of art within their work.

“Painting 2.0” shows in three inter-related sections how artists handled questions like the meaning of corporality or the development of social networks.The first thing you see entering the gallery is a container filled with destroyed pictures. Martin Kippenberger addresses with this work the relationship of art and spectacle. This relationship is the focus of the first section. It concentrates on the question of how art is able to create spectacles itself but also how it can reflect a culture of spectacle.

Exhibition Painting 2.0

On the top floor, the museum shows works focusing on the question of corporality. Artists critically explore how technologies transform our image of us and others.

In the basement the exhibition is completed by paintings centred around social networks. So for example there you can find computer generated pictures or a painting of a huge socket symbolising our dependency on electricity.

For a good overview of the exhibition I found this video from the Bayerische Rundfunk.  Unfortunately it is only available in German but even without the text you get a good impression about the works shown in the exhibition.

Overall “Painting 2.0” looks at some of the pressing issues of our society. It explains and shows how art  paralleled societal changes since the 1960s and how it struggled around the question of its own meaning. The pictures might not have the beauty of a painting by Monet or Da Vinci but they challenge your perception and leave you with some deep thoughts about how technology changes our world.

For that reason and the great line-up of popular artists like Andy Warhol, Georg Baselitz or Martin Kippenberger the exhibition is worth every visit. It is running until the 30th April, so there is some time left for you to go.

Have you been to a great museum or exhibition lately?

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